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February 11, 2019

J. Paul Getty Museum Presents Marks of Collaboration: Drawings in Context

Centered on the Museum's recently acquired design for a painted glass window by Christoph Murer, this installation explores the ways in which sixteenth-century Swiss designers and glass painters communicated with each other through drawings. With a selection of five works, the display investigates how visual and textual information provided by designers, guided the execution of paintings on glass. Through close study, visitors can uncover the designer's cues and grasp how these two sorts of artists worked together so successfully. Curated by Edina Adam.

January 29, 2019

J. Paul Getty Museum Presents Pontormo: Miraculous Encounters

At the end of the 1520s, during the siege that brought to an end the last Florentine Republic, the painter Jacopo da Pontormo created one of his most moving and innovative altarpieces, the Visitation. Recent conservation has created the extraordinary opportunity for the work to travel for the first time from Carmignano (near Florence) to the United States. This exhibition presents Pontormo’s spectacular painting alongside its preparatory drawing and two exceptional portraits painted during the same tumultuous period. Curated by Davide Gasparotto.

Organized by the Gallerie degli Uffizi, the J. Paul Getty Museum and the Morgan Library & Museum.

This exhibition is made possible with generous support from Mr. and Mrs. J. Tomilson Hill, and the Foundation for Italian Art and Culture (FIAC).

January 28, 2019

Getty Museum Presents First Major Exhibition of the Work of Oscar G. Rejlander

Often referred to as the “father of art photography,” Oscar G. Rejlander has been praised for his early experiments with combination printing; for his collaboration with Charles Darwin; and for his influence on the work of Julia Margaret Cameron and Lewis Carroll. This ground-breaking exhibition is the first major retrospective on Rejlander, highlighting new research and a selection of works brought together for the first time. Curated by Karen Hellman.

 

Organized by the Canadian Photography Institute of the National Gallery of Canada.

January 15, 2019

Getty Museum Presents Mapping Space: Recent Acquisitions in Focus

A display of photographs from the Museum’s collection that explore the work of artists who have departed from the traditional rules of landscape composition to document specific geographic locations in new ways.  Uta Barth, Robert Kinmont, Richard Long, Mark Ruwedel, and Wang Jinsong use photography to describe natural and built environments through unspecified modes of measurement and intuitive use of perspective. Influenced by the legacy of Conceptualism, a movement that gained popularity in the 1960s, these works emphasize each maker’s personal relationships with the chosen sites. Curated by Arpad Kovacs.

December 11, 2018

The J. Paul Getty Museum Presents Artful Words: Calligraphy in Illuminated Manuscripts

The written word was an art form in the premodern world. Calligraphers filled the pages of manuscripts with scrolling vines and delicate pen flourishes, and illuminators depicted captivating narratives within large letterforms. These decorative embellishments reveal the monetary, cultural, and spiritual value placed on handmade books at the time. The alphabetic adornments in this exhibition enliven the content of a range of manuscripts—including sacred scripture, romance literature, and history—produced from England to Ethiopia over nearly one thousand years. Curated by Bryan C. Keene and Katherine Sedovic.

December 06, 2018

The J. Paul Getty Museum Presents Spectacular Mysteries: Renaissance Drawings Revealed

Comprising spectacular drawings from the Getty collection and rarely-seen works from private collections, this exhibition reveals the detective work involved in investigating master drawings. Many Italian Renaissance drawings tell stories of their creation and the purposes they served, yet sometimes even the most seemingly simple question – who drew it? – is a mystery. Discover what we know and don’t know, what we’d like to know, and what we may never discover about these intriguing works of art and their world. Curated by Julian Brooks and Jamie Kwan.

November 19, 2018

Getty Research Institute Presents MONUMENTality

Monumentality evokes an aura of greatness, a sense of power and gravity that demands public recognition. As markers of history and repositories of collective memory, monuments can project multiple and sometimes contradictory meanings. Monuments might outlast their original purpose, meet their demise through violent conflict or artistic intervention, or simply become forgotten in the fabric of everyday life. This exhibition investigates various paradigms of monumentality, prompting viewers to consider why certain monuments endure and others fall.

September 18, 2018

First Major International Overview of the Work of Photographer Sally Mann Travels to Getty Museum

The first major international exhibition of the work of American born photographer, Sally Mann. The exhibition explores themes of family, memory, mortality, and the Southern landscape as repository of personal and collective memory. Experimental, melancholic, and hauntingly beautiful Mann’s photographs - many not exhibited before - expose how her relationship with the land has shaped her work and how the legacy of the South continues to permeate American identity. Curated by Mazie M. Harris.

 

Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington, and the Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, Massachusetts. 

August 27, 2018

The J. Paul Getty Museum Presents All that Glitters: Life at the Renaissance Court

Images of courtiers feasting at lavish tables and knights in gleaming armor are emblematic of the Renaissance courts of Europe. However, life at court was governed by many codes of conduct. The monarch affirmed his political authority through pageantry, and even leisure activities such as hunting and jousting, were subject to strict social hierarchies. This exhibition explores how the luxury arts, from illuminated manuscripts to textiles, helped construct the identities of the court elite.

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