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November 11, 2013

The Getty Presents Chatting with Henri Matisse: The 1941 Lost Interview

Modern Art Notes' Tyler Green and Art Historian Serge Guilbaut will Discuss the Newly Published Matisse Interview, Suppressed by the Artist Seven Decades Ago

Sunday November 17, 2013, 3 p.m.
Harold M. Williams Auditorium, Getty Center


MEDIA CONTACT:                 
Amy Hood
Getty Communications
(310) 440-6427

LOS ANGELES—In 1941 Pierre Courthion conducted an extensive interview with Henri Matisse that was seen at the time as a vital assessment of his career. But just weeks before the book was to come out, Matisse suppressed its publication. This rich conversation was published for the first time this year by the Getty Research Institute. On November 17 at 3:00 p.m. in the Harold M. Williams Auditorium in the Getty Center, Tyler Green, editor of Modern Art Notes, will discuss the significance of "Chatting with Henri Matisse" with the book's editor, art historian Serge Guilbaut. The event is free, but reservations are required.

About the book:

Chatting with Henri Matisse: The Lost 1941 Interview (Getty Publications, $45.00, hardcover) publishes for the first time this in-depth conversation, conducted during the Nazi occupation of France, and appearing here in both English translation and in the original French version. Matisse unravels memories of his youth and his life as a bohemian student in Gustave Moreau’s atelier. He recounts his experience with collectors, including Alfred Barnes. He discusses fame, writers, musicians, politicians, and, most fascinatingly, his travels. The book is introduced by Serge Guilbaut, contains a preface by Claude Duthuit, Matisse’s grandson, and essays by Yve-Alain Bois and Laurence Bertrand Dorléac. The book includes unpublished correspondence and other original documents related to Courthion’s interview and abounds with details about avant-garde life, tactics, and artistic creativity in the first half of the twentieth century.

About the Editor:

Serge Guilbaut, a professor of art history at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, writes extensively on modern and contemporary art. His books include How New York Stole the Idea of Modern Art: Abstract Expressionism, Freedom, and the Cold War (University of Chicago Press, 1983), Voir, ne pas voir, faut voir (Harmonia Mundi, 1993), and Los espejismos de la imagen en los lindes del siglo XXI (Akal Ediciones, 2009).

This event is free and open to the public. Parking is $15 per car. Reservation can be made at


The J. Paul Getty Trust is an international cultural and philanthropic institution devoted to the visual arts that includes the J. Paul Getty Museum, the Getty Research Institute, the Getty Conservation Institute, and the Getty Foundation. The J. Paul Getty Trust and Getty programs serve a varied audience from two locations:  the Getty Center in Los Angeles and the Getty Villa in Malibu.

The Getty Research Institute is an operating program of the J. Paul Getty Trust. It serves education in the broadest sense by increasing knowledge and understanding about art and its history through advanced research. The Research Institute provides intellectual leadership through its research, exhibition, and publication programs and provides service to a wide range of scholars worldwide through residencies, fellowships, online resources, and a Research Library. The Research Library—housed in the 201,000-square-foot Research Institute building designed by Richard Meier—is one of the largest art and architecture libraries in the world. The general library collections (secondary sources) include almost 900,000 volumes of books, periodicals, and auction catalogues encompassing the history of Western art and related fields in the humanities. The Research Library's special collections include rare books, artists' journals, sketchbooks, architectural drawings and models, photographs, and archival materials.

Visiting the Getty Center
The Getty Center is open Tuesday through Friday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. It is closed Monday and major holidays. Admission to the Getty Center is always free. Parking is $15 per car, but reduced to $10 after 5 p.m. on Saturdays and for evening events throughout the week. No reservation is required for parking or general admission. Reservations are required for event seating and groups of 15 or more. Please call (310) 440-7300 (English or Spanish) for reservations and information. The TTY line for callers who are deaf or hearing impaired is (310) 440-7305. The Getty Center is at 1200 Getty Center Drive, Los Angeles, California.

Same day parking at both Museum locations (Getty Center and Getty Villa) is available for $15 through the Getty's Pay Once, Park Twice program.

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