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June 25, 2015

Bacchus Uncorked


New program series on art, wine, and culture debuts at the Getty Villa


MEDIA CONTACT:    
Desiree Zenowich
Getty Communications
(310) 440-7304
dzenowich@getty.edu

 
LOS ANGELES - The J. Paul Getty Museum launches Bacchus Uncorked, a new occasional series focusing on the grape in the ancient world. Hear insightful talks about wine cultivation and drinking practices from experts in archaeology, classical history, literature, and science, then enjoy a sommelier-led wine tasting at a special outdoor reception.

Take advantage of late summer hours, when the Villa remains open until 9:00 pm on Saturdays, to cap off the evening with a visit to the galleries where numerous Greek and Roman vessels for mixing and serving wine are on display. The July programs complement the exhibition Ancient Luxury and the Roman Silver Treasure from Berthouville on view through August 17, 2015.

Bacchus Uncorked debuts with two evenings in July:

Travels with Bacchus: How an Enigmatic Wine-God Came to France, Saturday, July 11
The ancients believed that it was the wine-god Bacchus—or to the Greeks, Dionysos—who first introduced the fruit of the vine and its fermented juice to humans. He traveled extensively from east to west, sharing his gift to all who would accept him. Join noted classicist and culinary historian Albert Leonard, Jr., as he sheds light on the early history of wine through ancient literature and modern archaeological evidence, and tracks Bacchus on his epic journey throughout the Mediterranean world. Following his talk, enjoy a reception and wine tasting led by certified sommelier Mark Botieff in the picturesque outdoor setting of the Getty Villa.

Travels with Bacchus: How an Enigmatic Wine-God Came to France, Saturday, July 11.
5:30–8:00 p.m. Auditorium and Cafe Terrace. Admission: $60; advance ticket required. Includes lecture, wine tasting reception, and parking. Call (310) 440-7300 or reserve online. Parking is $10 after 5:00 p.m.

Vinum, Vidi, Vici: Wine, Culture, and Colonialism in Ancient Gaul, Saturday, July 18.
While France is known for its fine wine, it was the Etruscans in the 7th century B.C. who first introduced the fermented beverage to ancient Gaul, forever changing the region. Anthropologist Michael Dietler takes a look at the role wine and viniculture played in transforming the cultural, social, and commercial landscape that would become modern France. The luxurious Roman silver wine vessels unearthed at Berthouville in northern France, which are currently on view at the Getty Villa, helps deepen our understanding of the people who acquired and used them. After the talk, enjoy the summer evening with a reception and wine tasting led by certified sommelier Mark Botieff.

Vinum, Vidi, Vici: Wine, Culture, and Colonialism in Ancient Gaul, Saturday, July 18.
5:30–8:00 p.m. in the Auditorium and Cafe Terrace at the Getty Villa. Admission: $60; advance ticket required. Includes lecture, wine tasting reception, and parking. Call (310) 440-7300 or reserve online. Parking is $10 after 5:00 p.m. Generous support for these programs has been provided by the Villa Council.
 
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The J. Paul Getty Trust is an international cultural and philanthropic institution devoted to the visual arts that includes the J. Paul Getty Museum, the Getty Research Institute, the Getty Conservation Institute, and the Getty Foundation. The J. Paul Getty Trust and Getty programs serve a varied audience from two locations: the Getty Center in Los Angeles and the Getty Villa in Pacific Palisades.

The J. Paul Getty Museum collects Greek and Roman antiquities, European paintings, drawings, manuscripts, sculpture and decorative arts to 1900, as well as photographs from around the world to the present day. The Museum's mission is to display and interpret its collections, and present important loan exhibitions and publications for the enjoyment and education of visitors locally and internationally. This is supported by an active program of research, conservation, and public programs that seek to deepen our knowledge of and connection to works of art.

Visiting the Getty Villa
The Getty Villa is open Wednesday through Monday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., with special Saturday hours until 9 p.m. May 30-August 23. It is closed Tuesday and most major holidays, open on July 4. Admission to the Getty Villa is always free. A ticket is required for admission. Tickets can be ordered in advance, or on the day of your visit, at www.getty.edu/visit or at (310) 440-7300. Parking is $15 per car. Groups of 15 or more must make reservations by phone. For more information, call (310) 440-7300 (English or Spanish); (310) 440-7305 (TTY line for the deaf or hearing impaired). The Getty Villa is at 17985 Pacific Coast Highway, Pacific Palisades, California.

Additional information is available at www.getty.edu.
Sign up for e-Getty at www.getty.edu/subscribe to receive free monthly highlights of events at the Getty Center and the Getty Villa via e-mail, or visit www.getty.edu for a complete calendar of public programs.
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