FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

October 27, 2017

Getty Villa Theater Lab Series Presents one of the Earliest Known Refugees Stories and Oldest Surviving Drama from Ancient Greece

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

MEDIA CONTACT:

Desiree Zenowich

Getty Communications

310-440-7304

dzenowich@getty.edu

 

GETTY VILLA THEATER LAB SERIES PRESENTS ONE OF

THE EARLIEST KNOWN REFUGEES STORIES AND

OLDEST SURVIVING DRAMA FROM ANCIENT GREECE


Aeschylus’s The Suppliant Women

Photo: Massimo Sestini

Presented by Rogue Machine Theatre

Translated by George Theodoridis
Directed by Michael Arabian
Produced by Michael Arabian, Joshua Bitton, and John Perrin Flynn

 

At the Getty Villa

 

Friday, November 17, 2017 at 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, November 18, 2017 at 3:00 and 7:30 p.m.
Sunday, November 19, 2017 at 3:00 p.m.

 

LOS ANGELES – In November, the Getty Villa Theater Lab begins this season’s series with Aeschylus’s The Suppliant Women, presented by Los Angeles-based Rogue Machine Theatre and directed by Michael Arabian. The Villa Theater Lab features work-in-progress versions of new translations/adaptations of Greek and Roman plays as well as contemporary works inspired by ancient literature.

 

Aeschylus’s The Suppliant Women, one of the oldest surviving dramas from ancient Greece, is the first play and only surviving full text of the lost Danaid Tetralogy. The tetralogy was inspired by the myth of Io and her two warring sons, Aegyptus and Danaos. After Aegyptus usurps Danaos’s throne, the 50 sons of Aegyptus seek to possess the 50 daughters of Danaos by forced marriage. Danaos and his daughters reject the compulsory unions and flee to Argos for sanctuary, pursued by the Egyptians.

 

Translated by renowned writer and translator George Theodoridis, The Suppliant Women is one of Aeschylus’s most poetic pieces and one of the earliest known stories of refugees. In this timely production at the Villa, Argos is modern Greece and the daughters, wearing life jackets and arriving on overcrowded boats, are Syrian refugees. This ancient play has neither hero, nor downfall, nor even tragic conclusion. Instead, the play’s themes, still pertinent today, explore human rights, the continuing oppression of women, and societal reactions to refugees.

 

All performances take place in the Villa Auditorium. Tickets are $7 and can be reserved by calling 310-440-7300 or at http://www.getty.edu/museum/programs/performances/theater_lab.html.

 


About the Director
Michael Arabian has directed and produced numerous West Coast and world premieres in New York and Los Angeles, winning over 50 awards. In Los Angeles, he is best known for his production of Waiting for Godot at the Mark Taper Forum in 2012 which was honored with five Los Angeles Drama Critics Circle Awards, including Outstanding Production and Direction. It was also nominated for ten Ovation Awards, winning five, including Best Production.

In 2016 Arabian directed Disgraced at San Diego Repertory Theatre, which received a San Diego Critics Award nomination for Best Production, and Red starring John Vickery. Both shows made the San Diego CityBeat’s Top 10 list. He also directed Six Dance Lessons in Six Weeks, starring the dance icon Leslie Caron at the Laguna Playhouse and Staging the Unstageable (commemorating the centennial of the Armenian Genocide) at the Kirk Douglas Theatre. Other productions at the Mark Taper include Samuel Beckett’s Krapp’s Last Tape, Edward Albee’s The Sandbox, Harold Pinter’s A Slight Ache, and workshops of new works.

His site-specific company, Theatre InSite, formed a partnership with CBS (Radford) Studios (a first for L.A. theater), to produce live TV pilots (Third Rock from the Sun picked up) and inventive, large-scale productions, such as an updated production of Romeo and Juliet where audiences followed scenes and car chases through the backlot’s suburban streets, and The Trojan Women set during the Gulf War and staged in 400,000 gallons of water at the old Gilligan’s Island Lagoon site.

Arabian’s film King of the Ants, shot on 35mm film, is distributed by Vanguard Cinema.

About the Company
Rogue Machine Theatre was founded in 2008 as a performing arts organization to serve the greater Los Angeles community by developing and nurturing emerging playwrights, introducing important new contemporary works to Southern California, and engaging diverse audiences by presenting vital, invigorating productions. The company mirrors and examines contemporary culture as a theater of ideas and imagination.

This year, Rogue Machine Theatre (RMT) received the Polly Warfield Award for Outstanding Season from the Los Angeles Drama Critics Circle, making it the only theater company to be given this award twice in the past sixteen years. The company is a recipient of the American Theatre Wing’s 2014 National Theatre Company Grant, awarded to select theater organizations for the development of new work and other significant contributions to the field of professional theater in the United States. World premieres have subsequently played off Broadway, in major regional theaters, and at the Donmar Warehouse in London. RMT has been nominated for the Los Angeles Drama Critics Circle and/or Ovation Awards Best Production in Los Angeles in six of the last seven years and has won each award three times. In addition, RMT has garnered more than 60 awards for direction, design, and acting. More information is available at RogueMachineTheatre.com.

 

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The J. Paul Getty Museum collects Greek and Roman antiquities, European paintings, drawings, manuscripts, sculpture and decorative arts to 1900, as well as photographs from around the world to the present day. The Museum’s mission is to display and interpret its collections, and present important loan exhibitions and publications for the enjoyment and education of visitors locally and internationally. This is supported by an active program of research, conservation, and public programs that seek to deepen our knowledge of and connection to works of art.

 

Visiting the Getty Villa From May 28-August 26, 2017, the Getty Villa is open Wednesday through Monday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and on Saturday until 9:00 p.m. It is closed Tuesday and most major holidays. The Villa will be closed on Tuesday, July 4, Independence Day. Admission to the Getty Villa is always free, but a ticket is required for admission. Tickets can be ordered in advance, or on the day of your visit, at www.getty.edu/visit or at (310) 440-7300. Parking is $15 per car, but reduced to $10 after 3 p.m. Groups of 15 or more must make reservations by phone. For more information, call (310) 440-7300 (English or Spanish); (310) 440-7305 (TTY line for the deaf or hearing impaired). The Getty Villa is at 17985 Pacific Coast Highway, Pacific Palisades, California. Same-day parking at both Museum locations (Getty Center and Getty Villa) is available for $15 through the Getty’s Pay Once, Park Twice program.

 

Additional information is available at www.getty.edu. Sign up for e-Getty at www.getty.edu/subscribe to receive free monthly highlights of events at the Getty Center and the Getty Villa via e-mail, or visit www.getty.edu for a complete calendar of public programs.

 

 

 

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