Exhibitions at the Getty

A Look Ahead

Updated Mar 2019

Editors:

This information is subject to change. Please check news.getty.edu/exhibition-calendar/ for updates.

The Getty offers a wide range of public programs that complement these exhibitions. For a list of related events, please check the Getty 360 calendar at http://www.getty.edu/360/ or subscribe to e-Getty at www.getty.edu/subscribe to receive free monthly highlights via e-mail.

Images and press materials for exhibitions will post as they become available, or may be requested.

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Current Exhibitions:

PALMYRA THUMB

The Beauty of Palmyra, 190–210. Palmyran. Limestone. Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek, Copenhagen

Palmyra: Loss and Remembrance

Apr 18, 2018-May 27, 2019

Between the first and third centuries AD, the inhabitants of Palmyra, an ancient Syrian caravan city at the crossroads between the Roman and the Parthian empires, embellished their tombs with distinctive funerary portraits. These vivid likenesses of finely dressed men, women and children, often accompanied by inscriptions naming local families, illuminate cultural exchanges taking place in the eastern Mediterranean. This installation presents sculpture from the collections of the Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek in Copenhagen on long-term loan to the Getty alongside historical engravings and photographs from the Getty Research Institute.

J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Villa
Media Contact: Desiree Zenowich | (310) 440-7304 | dzenowich@getty.edu
Eighteenth-Century Pastel Portraits thumb

Portrait of Maria Frederike van Reede-Athlone at Seven Years of Age, 1755–56, Jean-Étienne Liotard, pastel on vellum. The J. Paul Getty Museum

Eighteenth-Century Pastel Portraits

Aug 28, 2018-Oct 13, 2019

Pastels—dry, satiny colors, manufactured in sticks of every hue—enjoyed a surge in popularity during the eighteenth century, becoming, for a time, the medium of choice for European portraiture. This display of pastels from the permanent collection explores the specific physical properties that made this medium so appealing to eighteenth-century portraitists and their patrons.

J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center
Media Contact: Valerie Tate | (310) 440 -6861 | vtate@getty.edu
monumen thumb

Mikhail Karasik (Russian, 1953–2017) Table 3, Palace of Soviets Project From Mikhail Karasik, The Palace of Soviets: Design Competition (Saint Petersburg, 2006) Lithograph Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles (2732-729) © Mikhail Karasik, 2006

Monumentality

Dec 04, 2018-Apr 21, 2019

Monumentality evokes an aura of greatness, a sense of power and gravity that demands public recognition. As markers of history and repositories of collective memory, monuments can project multiple and sometimes contradictory meanings. Monuments might outlast their original purpose, meet their demise through violent conflict or artistic intervention, or simply become forgotten in the fabric of everyday life. This exhibition investigates various paradigms of monumentality, prompting viewers to consider why certain monuments endure and others fall.

Getty Research Institute at the Getty Center
Media Contact: Amy Hood | 310 440-6427 | ahood@getty.edu
Spectacular Mysteries thumb

The Head of a Young Man, about 1539 – 1540, Parmigianino (Francesco Mazzola) (Italian, 1503 - 1540). Pen and brown ink. 16 × 10.5 cm (6 5/16 × 4 1/8 in.). The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles

Spectacular Mysteries: Renaissance Drawings Revealed

Dec 11, 2018-Apr 28, 2019

Comprising spectacular drawings from the Getty collection and rarely-seen works from private collections, this exhibition reveals the detective work involved in investigating master drawings. Many Italian Renaissance drawings tell stories of their creation and the purposes they served, yet sometimes even the most seemingly simple question – who drew it? – is a mystery. Discover what we know and don’t know, what we’d like to know, and what we may never discover about these intriguing works of art and their world. Curated by Julian Brooks and Jamie Kwan.

J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center
Media Contact: Valerie Tate | (310) 440 -6861 | vtate@getty.edu
Artful Words

Butterfly, Marine Mollusk, and Pear. Joris Hoefnagel (Flemish / Hungarian, 1542 - 1600) and Georg Bocskay (Hungarian, died 1575). Flemish and Hungarian. Vienna, Austria (Place created). 1561–1562; illumination added 1591–1596. Watercolors, gold and silver paint, and ink on parchment. Leaf: 16.6 × 12.4 cm (6 9/16 × 4 7/8 in.). Alternate Titles: Mira calligraphiae monumenta (Group Title).Object Number: Ms. 20, fol. 118 Alternate Number: 86.MV.527.118 

Artful Words: Calligraphy in Illuminated Manuscripts

Dec 18, 2018-Apr 07, 2019

The written word was an art form in the premodern world. Calligraphers filled the pages of manuscripts with scrolling vines and delicate pen flourishes, and illuminators depicted captivating narratives within large letterforms. These decorative embellishments reveal the monetary, cultural, and spiritual value placed on handmade books at the time. The alphabetic adornments in this exhibition enliven the content of a range of manuscripts—including sacred scripture, romance literature, and history—produced from England to Ethiopia over nearly one thousand years. Curated by Bryan C. Keene and Katherine Sedovic.

J. Paul Getty Trust at the Getty Center
Media Contact: Valerie Tate | (310) 440 -6861 | vtate@getty.edu
Marks thumbnail

Christoph Murer (Swiss, 1558 - 1614), Ecce Homo, the king Caspar, the Virgin and Child and the Arms of the Families Kündig and Pfyffer, 1592. Black ink, gray wash, traces of black chalk on four joined sheets of paper. 63.4 × 64.1 cm (24 15/16 × 25 1/4 in.).

Marks of Collaboration: Drawings in Context

Feb 05, 2019-Apr 14, 2019

Centered on the Museum's recently acquired design for a painted glass window by Christoph Murer, this installation explores the ways in which sixteenth-century Swiss designers and glass painters communicated with each other through drawings. With a selection of five works, the display investigates how visual and textual information provided by designers, guided the execution of paintings on glass. Through close study, visitors can uncover the designer's cues and grasp how these two sorts of artists worked together so successfully. Curated by Edina Adam.

J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center
Media Contact: Valerie Tate | (310) 440 -6861 | vtate@getty.edu
Pontormo Thumb

Pontormo (Jacopo Carucci) (Italian (Florentine), 1494 - 1557). Visitation, about 1520. Italian (Florentine). Oil on wood panel. Unframed: 202 × 156 cm (79 1/2 × 61 7/16 in.) Accession No. EX.2019.1.6 Object Credit: Parrocchia di San Michele Arcangelo a Carmignano (Prato) Repro Credit: Su concessione della Soprintendenza Archeologia, Belle Arti e Paesaggio per la Città Metropolitana di Firenze e per le Province di Pistoia e Prato. Photo © Antonio Quattrone, Florence

Pontormo: Miraculous Encounters

Feb 05, 2019-Apr 28, 2019

At the end of the 1520s, during the siege that brought to an end the last Florentine Republic, the painter Jacopo da Pontormo created one of his most moving and innovative altarpieces, the Visitation. Recent conservation has created the extraordinary opportunity for the work to travel for the first time from Carmignano (near Florence) to the United States. This exhibition presents Pontormo’s spectacular painting alongside its preparatory drawing and two exceptional portraits painted during the same tumultuous period. Curated by Davide Gasparotto.

Organized by the Gallerie degli Uffizi, the J. Paul Getty Museum and the Morgan Library & Museum.

This exhibition is made possible with generous support from Mr. and Mrs. J. Tomilson Hill, and the Foundation for Italian Art and Culture (FIAC).

J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center
Media Contact: Amy Hood | 310 440-6427 | ahood@getty.edu
Mapping thumb

Uta Barth (German, born 1958). Untitled. (Outside the Frame #9), 1981 - 1982. German. Gelatin silver print. Image: 11.2 × 11.1 cm (4 7/16 × 4 3/8 in.). Sheet: 25.4 × 20.3 cm (10 × 8 in.). Accession No. 2012.21.9. Copyright: © Uta Barth. Object Credit: The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles

 

 

Mapping Space: Recent Acquisitions in Focus

Feb 26, 2019-Jul 14, 2019

A display of photographs from the Museum’s collection that explore the work of artists who have departed from the traditional rules of landscape composition to document specific geographic locations in new ways.  Uta Barth, Robert Kinmont, Richard Long, Mark Ruwedel, and Wang Jinsong use photography to describe natural and built environments through unspecified modes of measurement and intuitive use of perspective. Influenced by the legacy of Conceptualism, a movement that gained popularity in the 1960s, these works emphasize each maker’s personal relationships with the chosen sites. Curated by Arpad Kovacs.

J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center
Media Contact: Alexandria Sivak | (310) 440-6473 | asivak@getty.edu
Encore thumb

Eileen Cowin (American, born 1947). Magritte, 1987. American. Dye diffusion print. 61 × 48 cm (24 × 18 7/8 in.). 91.4 × 76.2 cm (36 × 30 in.). Accession No. 2015.15.49. © Eileen Cowin. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, Gift of The Artist

Encore: Reenactment in Contemporary Photography

Mar 12, 2019-Jun 09, 2019

The re-staging of past events presents an opportunity for contemporary photographers to highlight underrepresented stories and to critique established narratives. This exhibition brings together works by seven artists—Eileen Cowin, Christina Fernandez, Samuel Fosso, Yasumasa Morimura, Yinka Shonibare MBE, Gillian Wearing, and Qiu Zhijie—all of whom have utilized reenactment in their respective practices. Presented in three topics - personal history, political history, and art history—the works showcase very different approaches to engaging with the past. Curated by Arpad Kovacs.

J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center
Media Contact: Alexandria Sivak | (310) 440-6473 | asivak@getty.edu
rejlander thumb

Oscar Gustave Rejlander (British, born Sweden, 1813 - 1875). Enchanted by a Parrot, about 1860. British. Albumen silver print. Image (approx.): 50 × 30 cm (19 11/16 × 11 13/16 in.). Framed: 52 × 42 cm (20 1/2 × 16 9/16 in.). Accession No. EX.2019.5.58. Repro Credit: William T. Hillman Collection

Oscar Rejlander: Artist Photographer

Mar 12, 2019-Jun 09, 2019

Often referred to as the “father of art photography,” Oscar G. Rejlander has been praised for his early experiments with combination printing; for his collaboration with Charles Darwin; and for his influence on the work of Julia Margaret Cameron and Lewis Carroll. This ground-breaking exhibition is the first major retrospective on Rejlander, highlighting new research and a selection of works brought together for the first time. Curated by Karen Hellman.

 

Organized by the Canadian Photography Institute of the National Gallery of Canada.

J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center
Media Contact: Alexandria Sivak | (310) 440-6473 | asivak@getty.edu

Upcoming Exhibitions:

After Vesuvius thumb

Gérard-Jean Galle (French, 1788 - 1846).  French. Paris, France (Place created). about 1818–1819. Gilt bronze; enameled metal; glass. 73.DH.76. 129.5 × 96.5 cm (51 × 38 in.)

Flight of Fancy: The Galle Chandelier

Apr 09, 2019-Apr 19, 2020

This display provides an in-depth look at a French chandelier made by the bronze caster and gilder Gérard-Jean Galle in about 1818-19. Resembling a hot-air balloon, the chandelier is a work of extreme novelty that includes the signs of the zodiac and a glass bowl intended to hold water for small goldfish. Following contemporary taste, Galle adapted motifs found in ancient art to new forms of furniture creating an intriguing object that was thoroughly modern for its time. Curated by Jeffrey Weaver.

J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center
Media Contact: Amy Hood | 310 440-6427 | ahood@getty.edu

Leonardo da Vinci: 500 years

Apr 30, 2019-Jun 02, 2019

To commemorate the 500th anniversary of Leonardo da Vinci’s death (on May 2nd, 1519 in Amboise, France), the Getty Museum is placing on view the two rare drawings by the master from its collection. Incorporating draft studies for paintings, sculpture, machinery, and human physiognomy, along with his characteristic “mirror-writing,” the two sheets present a fascinating glimpse into the mind of this celebrated Renaissance polymath. Curated by Julian Brooks.

J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center
Media Contact: Amy Hood | 310 440-6427 | ahood@getty.edu
Wondrous Cosmos thumb

The Celestial Virgin and Child. Spitz Master (French, active about 1415 - 1425). French. Paris, France, Europe (Place created). about 1420. Tempera colors, gold, and ink on parchment. Ms. 57, fol. 176v. Leaf: 20.2 × 14.9 cm (7 15/16 × 5 7/8 in.) Alternate Titles: Book of Hours (Group Title) Virgin and Child in Glory (Published Title). 94.ML.26.176v (Object number)

The Wondrous Cosmos in Medieval Manuscripts

Apr 30, 2019-Jul 21, 2019

The cosmos—full of shining stars and orbiting planets—inspired study and devotion among scientists, theologians, and artists alike during the Middle Ages. The belief in angels, demons, and spirits moreover materialized in wondrous works of art, especially on the pages of illuminated manuscripts. Awe-inspiring cosmic phenomena informed every aspect of one’s physical, mental, and spiritual well-being in the premodern world. This exhibition invites you to explore the complexity of the celestial realm in medieval European faith and science traditions. Curated by Bryan C. Keene.

J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center
Media Contact: Valerie Tate | (310) 440 -6861 | vtate@getty.edu
Book of Beasts thumb

Liber Floridus. Unknown. French, 1460. E.2019.2.116

 

Book of Beasts: The Bestiary in the Medieval World

May 14, 2019-Aug 18, 2019

A vast throng of animals tumble, soar, and race through the pages of the bestiary, a popular medieval book describing the beasts of the world. Abounding with vibrant and fascinating images, the bestiary brought creatures to life before the eyes of readers. The beasts also often escaped from its pages to inhabit a glittering array of other objects. With over 100 works on display, this major loan exhibition will transport visitors into the world of the medieval bestiary. Curated by Elizabeth Morrison.

J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center
Media Contact: Amy Hood | 310 440-6427 | ahood@getty.edu

Artists as Collectors

Jun 02, 2019-Aug 16, 2019

Artists were the earliest and greatest collectors of drawings. Celebrated painters including Giorgio Vasari, Thomas Lawrence, and Edgar Degas were passionate collectors, and their appetites for drawings by old and contemporary masters compelled them to acquire exceptional examples of draftsmanship by artists such as Raphael, Rembrandt, and Delacroix. Not just a tool for the making of works of art, drawings were valued as intellectual property, coveted rarities, and powerful status symbols. Curated by Stephanie Schrader and Casey Lee.

J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center
Media Contact: Valerie Tate | (310) 440 -6861 | vtate@getty.edu
Reading Between thumb

After the Shipwreck - Design for an Illustration of Coleridge's The Rime of the Ancient Mariner. Gustave Doré (French, 1832 - 1883). about 1875. Gouache. Object Number: 2008.30. 50.8 × 40.5 cm (20 × 15 15/16 in.). Signed "G. Doré" in the lower right corner

 

Reading between the Lines: Drawing Illustrations

Jun 04, 2019-Sep 15, 2019

The illustration of written texts has provided artists with inspiration, and gainful employment, across the centuries. Presenting some of the most beautifully finished drawings and watercolors in the Getty collection, this exhibition explores illustration as a branch of artistic production in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Curated by Emily Beeny.

J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center
Media Contact: Valerie Tate | (310) 440 -6861 | vtate@getty.edu

Form and color study, Joost Schmidt, ca. 1929–1930. Watercolor over graphite on paper. Joost Schmidt Papers. The Getty Research Institute, 860972

Bauhaus Beginnings

Jun 11, 2019-Oct 13, 2019

The Bauhaus was a German school of art and design whose brief yet highly influential existence rendered it a key site in the development of a new modern vision for arts education. Established in 1919 after the end of World War I, the Bauhaus sought to erode distinctions between crafts and the fine arts through a program of study centered on theory and practical experience.

Marking the one hundredth anniversary of the school’s opening, Bauhaus Beginnings investigates the school’s early commitment to spiritual expression, its innovative first-year curriculum, and its use of diverse media to introduce the work of students and masters to international audiences. The exhibition draws on the Getty Research Institute’s extensive collection of Bauhaus material—including course exercises, teaching aids and notes, and rare prints, drawings, and photographs—to offer a colorful and surprising reexamination of the founding principles of this landmark institution.

Getty Research Institute at the Getty Center
Media Contact: Amy Hood | 310 440-6427 | ahood@getty.edu
after thumb

Getty Villa; Outer Peristyle. Tahnee L. Cracchiola. Copyright J. Paul Getty Trust

Buried by Vesuvius: Treasures from the Villa dei Papiri

Jun 26, 2019-Oct 28, 2019

The Getty Villa is modeled on the Villa dei Papiri at Herculaneum. Buried by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in AD 79, the ancient villa was rediscovered and explored by subterranean tunnels in the 1750s and '60s again in the 1990s and early 2000s. It has yielded spectacular colored marble and mosaic floors, frescoed walls, a large collection of bronze and marble statuary, and a library of more than a thousand papyrus scrolls. This exhibition presents rare original artifacts and traces attempts to unroll and decipher the carbonized papyri.

J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Villa
Media Contact: Desiree Zenowich | (310) 440-7304 | dzenowich@getty.edu

John Martin: A New Acquisition

Jul 02, 2019-Oct 06, 2019

Information to come. 

J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center
Media Contact: Valerie Tate | (310) 440 -6861 | vtate@getty.edu

Once. Again. Photographs in Series

Jul 09, 2019-Nov 10, 2019

Photographers often record change through images in series, registering transformations in the world around them. Artists featured in the exhibition photographed faces and places over minutes, months, or years. Historical and contemporary photographs prompt reflection on the ways the passage of time impacts how we see people and spaces. Curated by Mazie Harris.

J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center
Media Contact: Alexandria Sivak | (310) 440-6473 | asivak@getty.edu

Gordon Parks: The Flávio Story

Jul 09, 2019-Nov 10, 2019

On assignment to document poverty in Brazil for Life magazine, American photographer Gordon Parks encountered one of the most important subjects of his career: Flávio da Silva. Parks featured the resourceful, ailing boy from an impoverished Rio favela (Portuguese for shantytown) and his family in the heart-rending 1961 photo essay “Freedom’s Fearful Foe.” It resulted in donations from Life readers but sparked controversy in Brazil. This exhibition explores the celebrated photo essay, tracing the extraordinary chain of events it triggered and Parks’ representation of Flávio over several decades. Curated by Amanda Maddox.  

J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center
Media Contact: Alexandria Sivak | 310.440.6473 | asivak@getty.edu

The Camera: In Focus

Jul 30, 2019-Dec 15, 2019

Once a simple wooden box with a primitive lens and cap for controlling light, the modern camera has undergone enormous change since its invention in the early nineteenth-century. Flexible film stocks, built-in light meters, motor drives, and megapixels are a few of the advancements that have transformed the way this ingenious device captures and preserves a moment in time. This display explores the evolution of the camera through the Museum’s collection of historic cameras and photographs. Curated by Paul Martineau.

J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center
Media Contact: Alexandria Sivak | (310) 440-6473 | asivak@getty.edu

Blurring the Line: Manuscripts in the Age of Print

Aug 06, 2019-Oct 27, 2019

The history of the book in the late Middle Ages is a story of competing media as the handwritten and the illuminated encountered the print revolution in Europe. New printing technologies gave rise to a rich period of experimental cross-fertilization during which artists created hybrid works, books printed to look like manuscripts, and painted compositions modeled after prints. This exhibition includes masterpieces of both media, challenging the division between them considering the culture of the book as technology met artistry.

J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center
Media Contact: Valerie Tate | (310) 440 -6861 | vtate@getty.edu

Assyria: Palace Art of Ancient Iraq

Oct 02, 2019-Sep 06, 2022

Assyrian kings in the ninth to seventh centuries B.C. decorated their palaces with masterful relief sculptures that represent a high point of Mesopotamian art, both for their artistic quality and sophistication and for their vivid depictions of warfare, rituals, mythology, hunting, and other aspects of Assyrian court life. The importance of these ancient treasures has only increased with the recent destruction, by ISIS, of many of the reliefs that remained in Iraq.

 

The masterworks in this exhibition are on special loan from the British Museum, London.

J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Villa
Media Contact: Desiree Zenowich | (310) 440-7304 | dzenowich@getty.edu

Manet and Modern Beauty (Working Title)

Oct 08, 2019-Jan 12, 2020

Édouard Manet (1832-1883) earned his place as the leading avant-garde painter of modern Paris through a series of provocative paintings that shocked contemporary audiences. The first exhibition ever to explore the last years of his short life, Manet and Modern Beauty highlights a less familiar and more intimate side of this celebrated artist’s work. Stylish portraits, luscious still lifes, delicate pastels and watercolors, vivid café and garden scenes convey Manet’s elegant social world and reveal his growing fascination with fashion, flowers, and the parisienne—for the artist, a feminine embodiment of modern life in all its particular, fleeting beauty.

J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center
Media Contact: Amy Hood | 310 440-6427 | ahood@getty.edu

True Grit: American Prints and Photographs from 1900 to 1950

Oct 15, 2019-Jan 19, 2020

With works drawn from local museums, a private collection, and the Getty’s own collection, True Grit provides two vibrant surveys: one of early twentieth-century American printmaking and the other a complementary photography rotation. Compelling depictions of the time convey a broad view of American culture that include dance halls and boxing rings, skyscrapers and subways, parks and tenement apartments. Using innovative techniques, these American artists captured the gritty world around them and came to terms with modern life.

 

J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center
Media Contact: Alexandria Sivak | (310) 440-6473 | asivak@getty.edu

Peasants in Pastel: Jean-François Millet and the Pastel Revival (Working Title)

Oct 29, 2019-May 10, 2020

Long associated with aristocratic portraiture, pastel had fallen out of fashion by the mid-nineteenth-century, when Jean-François Millet (1814 – 1875) turned the powdery medium to a quite different purpose: scenes of contemporary peasant life. This installation presents a selection of pastels by Millet and his followers, addressing the relationship between rural labor and urban collecting and encouraging visitors to consider how an artist’s chosen medium affects our understanding of his or her subject matter. Curated by Emily Beeny.

J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center
Media Contact: Valerie Tate | (310) 440 -6861 | vtate@getty.edu

Balthazar: A Black-African King in Medieval and Renaissance Art

Nov 19, 2019-Feb 16, 2020

Early medieval legends reported that one of the three kings who paid homage to the newborn Christ Child in Bethlehem was from Africa. But it would be nearly one thousand years before artists began representing Balthazar, the youngest of the magi, as a black African. This exhibition explores the juxtaposition of a seemingly positive image with the difficult histories of Afro-European contact – in particular the brutal African slave trade – which informed European artists’ interest in representing race. Curated by Kristen Collins and Bryan Keene.

J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center
Media Contact: Amy Hood | 310 440-6427 | ahood@getty.edu

Unseen: 35 Years of Collecting Photographs

Dec 17, 2019-Mar 08, 2020

Commemorating the 35th anniversary of the Museum’s collection of photographs, this exhibition reveals the breadth and depth of the Getty’s acquisitions through an array of its greatest hidden treasures, none of which have been exhibited at the Getty before. Spanning the history of the medium from its early years to the present day, UNSEEN highlights visual associations between photographs from different times and places to encourage fresh discoveries and underscore a sense of continuity and change within the history of the medium. Curated by James A. Ganz, with Mazie Harris, Virginia Heckert, Karen Hellman, Arpad Kovacs, Amanda Maddox, and Paul Martineau.

J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center
Media Contact: Alexandria Sivak | (310) 440-6473 | asivak@getty.edu

In Focus: Platinum and Palladium

Jan 21, 2020-May 31, 2020

Revered for its velvety matte surface and neutral palette, the platinum process, introduced in 1873, helped establish photography as a fine art. The process was championed by prominent photographers until platinum was embargoed during World War I, but it attracted renewed interest during the mid-twentieth century from a relatively small but dedicated community of practitioners. This exhibition draws from the Getty Museum’s collection to showcase some of the most striking prints made with platinum and the closely related palladium processes. Curated by Arpad Kovacs.

J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center
Media Contact: Alexandria Sivak | (310) 440-6473 | asivak@getty.edu

Artists on the Move: Journeys and Drawings

Feb 11, 2020-May 03, 2020

Why did artists leave their homes behind? How did they use the medium of drawing to record their journeys? And how did mobility impact their draftsmanship? This exhibition, featuring works by Rubens, Canaletto, van Gogh, and Gauguin, explores such questions through a selection of European drawings from the Museum’s permanent collection, spanning from the sixteenth to the nineteenth centuries. Curated by Edina Adam.

J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center
Media Contact: Valerie Tate | (310) 440 -6861 | vtate@getty.edu

Recent Acquisitions (Drawings)

Feb 11, 2020-May 03, 2020

Information to come. 

J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center
Media Contact: Valerie Tate | (310) 440 -6861 | vtate@getty.edu

Michelangelo: Mind of the Master

Feb 25, 2020-Jun 07, 2020

Michelangelo (1475-1564) was one of the most creative and influential artists in the history of western art. This exhibition explores the full range of his work as a painter, sculptor, and architect through more than two dozen of his extraordinary drawings, including designs for celebrated projects such as the Sistine Chapel ceiling, the Medici Chapel tombs, and the Last Judgement. These working studies and sketches enable us to witness Michelangelo at work, and to experience firsthand his boundless creativity and his pioneering representation of the human form. Curated by Julian Brooks and Edina Adam.

J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center
Media Contact: Valerie Tate | (310) 440 -6861 | vtate@getty.edu

Painted Prophecy: The Hebrew Bible through Medieval Eyes

Mar 10, 2020-May 31, 2020

Images drawn from the Hebrew Bible (known to Christians as the Old Testament) were among the most popular subjects for Christian illuminated manuscripts in the Middle Ages. This exhibition brings manuscripts that explore the medieval Christian understanding of Hebrew scripture into dialogue with the Rothschild Pentateuch, a masterpiece of the Jewish manuscript tradition. Together, these objects from different religious traditions demonstrate how the Hebrew Bible was a living document, its contents subject to interpretation dependent on time and place. Curated by Larisa Grollemond.

J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center
Media Contact: Valerie Tate | (310) 440 -6861 | vtate@getty.edu

Mesopotamia (Working Title)

Mar 18, 2020-Jul 27, 2020

Ancient Mesopotamia—the “land between the rivers” in the area of modern-day Iraq—was home to the Sumerians and other early cultures that have a central role in the history of civilization. Among its achievements are the creation of the earliest known script (cuneiform), the construction of monumental cities, the development of advanced astronomical and mathematical knowledge, and artistic and literary achievements that rival any in the ancient world. The exhibition covers three millennia from the first writing in about 3200 B.C. to Alexander the Great’s conquest of Babylon in 331 B.C. Curated by Timothy Potts and Ariane Thomas, Musee du Louvre, assisted by Jens Daehner and Sara Cole.  

J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Villa
Media Contact: Desiree Zenowich | (310) 440-7304 | dzenowich@getty.edu

Dora Maar (working title)

Apr 21, 2020-Jul 26, 2020

Enigmatic and endlessly fascinating, Dora Maar (French, 1907 – 1997) generated iconic surrealist photographs, engaged with political organizations, and established a commercial studio in Paris—all before the age of thirty. Despite these achievements, her work remains overshadowed by her relationship with Pablo Picasso. This exhibition examines Maar in her own right, tracing her career from assignments and street photographs made in the early 1930s—often the foundation for her surrealist photomontages—to postwar paintings. It also considers the rich historical context from which Maar emerged. Curated by Amanda Maddox (co-curators Damarice Amao and Karolina Lewandowska, Centre Pompidou).

J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center
Media Contact: Alexandria Sivak | (310) 440-6473 | asivak@getty.edu

In Focus: Election Eve

Jun 16, 2020-Nov 08, 2020

Photographs play a powerful role in American politics. This exhibition features William Eggleston’s Election Eve, a two-volume photography book made as the country readied for the 1976 presidential race, alongside other photographs from past and present that prompt reflection on the democratic process. Images of politicians, protests, and patriotism offer a timely take on civic life and the public experience of anticipation just before an election. Curated by Mazie Harris.

J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center
Media Contact: Alexandria Sivak | (310) 440-6473 | asivak@getty.edu

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