Exhibitions at the Getty

A Look Ahead

Updated Nov 2019

Anthony Hernandez, American, born 1947. Los Angeles #1 (detail). 1969. Gelatin silver print. 18.9 × 28.4 cm (7 7/16 × 11 3/16 in.) Mount: 34.3 × 40.6 cm (13 1/2 × 16 in.) © Anthony Hernandez

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This information is subject to change. Please check news.getty.edu/exhibition-calendar/ for updates.

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Images and press materials for exhibitions will post as they become available, or may be requested.

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Current Exhibitions:

After Vesuvius thumb

Gérard-Jean Galle (French, 1788 - 1846).  French. Paris, France (Place created). about 1818–1819. Gilt bronze; enameled metal; glass. 73.DH.76. 129.5 × 96.5 cm (51 × 38 in.)

Flight of Fancy: The Galle Chandelier

Apr 09, 2019-Apr 19, 2020

This display provides an in-depth look at a French chandelier made by the bronze caster and gilder Gérard-Jean Galle in about 1818-19. Resembling a hot-air balloon, the chandelier is a work of extreme novelty that includes the signs of the zodiac and a glass bowl intended to hold water for small goldfish. Following contemporary taste, Galle adapted motifs found in ancient art to new forms of furniture creating an intriguing object that was thoroughly modern for its time. Curated by Jeffrey Weaver.

J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center
Media Contact: Amy Hood | 310 440-6427 | ahood@getty.edu
Assyria Thumb

Royal Lion Hunt, 875 - 860 B.C, Unknown. Assyrian. Gypsum. Dimensions: Object: H: 95.8 Å~ W: 137.2 Å~ D: 20.3 cm (37 11/16 Å~ 54 Å~ 8 in.) British Museum [1849,1222.8] [1849]. Image © The Trustees of the British Museum. Accession No. VEX.2019.2.1

Assyria: Palace Art of Ancient Iraq

Oct 02, 2019-Sep 05, 2022

Assyrian kings in the ninth to seventh centuries B.C. decorated their palaces with masterful relief sculptures that represent a high point of Mesopotamian art, both for their artistic quality and sophistication and for their vivid depictions of warfare, rituals, mythology, hunting, and other aspects of Assyrian court life. The importance of these ancient treasures has only increased with the recent destruction, by ISIS, of many of the reliefs that remained in Iraq. Curated by Timothy Potts, assisted by Sara Cole. 

J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Villa
Media Contact: Desiree Zenowich | (310) 440-7304 | dzenowich@getty.edu
Peasants Thumb

Shepherds in the Fields with Rainbow, 1885. Camille Pissarro. French, 1830 – 1903. Gouache and pastel. Sheet: 29.5 × 62.9 cm (11 5/8 × 24 3/4 in.) Framed: 40.8 × 74 × 3.2 cm (16 1/16 × 29 1/8 × 1 1/4 in.) Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Gift of Arnold S. Kirkeb

Peasants in Pastel: Millet and the Pastel Revival

Oct 29, 2019-May 10, 2020

Long associated with aristocratic portraiture, pastel had fallen out of fashion by the mid-nineteenth-century, when Jean-François Millet (1814 – 1875) turned the powdery medium to a quite different purpose: scenes of contemporary peasant life. This installation presents a selection of pastels by Millet and his followers, addressing the relationship between rural labor and urban collecting and encouraging visitors to consider how an artist’s chosen medium affects our understanding of his or her subject matter. Curated by Emily Beeny.

J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center
Media Contact: Valerie Tate | (310) 440 -6861 | vtate@getty.edu
Balthazar Thumb

The Adoration of the Magi, about 1480 – 1490. Georges Trubert. French, active Provence, France 1469 – 1508. Tempera colors, gold leaf, gold and silver paint, and ink on parchment. Leaf: 11.4 × 8.6 cm (4 1/2 × 3 3/8 in.) The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, Ms. 48, fol. 59

Balthazar: A Black African King in Medieval and Renaissance Art

Nov 19, 2019-Feb 16, 2020

Early medieval legends reported that one of the three kings who paid homage to the newborn Christ Child in Bethlehem was from Africa. But it would be nearly one thousand years before artists began representing Balthazar, the youngest of the magi, as a black African. This exhibition explores the juxtaposition of a seemingly positive image with the difficult histories of Afro-European contact – in particular the brutal African slave trade – which informed European artists’ interest in representing race. Curated by Kristen Collins and Bryan Keene.

J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center
Media Contact: Valerie Tate | (310) 440 -6861 | vtate@getty.edu
kollwitzthumb

Charge, Between 1902 and 1903, Käthe Kollwitz (German, 1867–1945). Sheet 5 of Peasants’ War. Etching, drypoint, aquatint, lift ground, and soft ground with the imprint of two fabrics and Ziegler’s transfer paper, printed in black ink on copperplate paper, and reworked with white pigment and black wash. State III of XIII. Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles. (2016.PR.34). Partial Gift of Dr. Richard A. Simms. © 2019 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Käthe Kollwitz: Prints, Process, Politics

Dec 03, 2019-Mar 29, 2020

This exhibition highlights extraordinary drawings and prints by Käthe Kollwitz (German, 1867–1945) from the Getty Research Institute’s Dr. Richard A. Simms Collection. Kollwitz created unforgettable scenes of struggling workers, rebellious peasants, and grieving mothers in series of works that reveal her innovative technical and formal experiments. Kollwitz’s commitment to showing the effects of war and poverty and her dedication to the creative process have made her one of the most compelling graphic artists of the 20th century. The exhibition is curated by Louis Marchesano, the Audrey and William H. Helfand Senior Curator of Prints, Drawings, and Photographs at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Christina Aube, Exhibitions Coordinator at the Getty Research Institute, and Naoko Takahatake, Curator of Prints and Drawings at the Getty Research Institute.

Getty Research Institute at the Getty Center
Media Contact: Amy Hood | 310 440-6427 | ahood@getty.edu
gm_37957001_2000x2000

Virgin and Child with Saint Elizabeth and Saint John the Baptist, about 1540 – 154. Agnolo Bronzino (Italian, 1503 - 1572) Oil on panel. Unframed (panel): 102.7 × 83.4 cm (40 7/16 × 32 13/16 in.) Unframed (panel with batten additions): 104.1 × 85.7 cm (41 × 33 ¾ in.) Framed: 148 × 128.9 × 11.4 cm (58 1/4 × 50 3/4 × 4 1/2 in.) The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles. 2019.116.

Museum Acquisitions 2019: Director’s Choice

Dec 10, 2019-Mar 01, 2020

The Getty is renowned for its ambitious collecting. This inaugural exhibition of recent acquisitions by the Getty Museum highlights the most important works of art added to the collection in the past year. Selected by the Museum's director, it includes ancient gems and sculpture; Renaissance and 19th-century paintings; Renaissance sculpture; medieval manuscripts; old-master drawings; and 20th-century and contemporary photography. Curated by Timothy Potts. 

J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center
Media Contact: Alexandria Sivak | (310) 440-6473 | asivak@getty.edu
unseen thumb

Los Angeles #1. 1969. Anthony Hernandez, American, born 1947. Gelatin silver print. 18.9 × 28.4 cm (7 7/16 × 11 3/16 in.) Mount: 34.3 × 40.6 cm (13 1/2 × 16 in.) © Anthony Hernandez

Unseen: 35 Years of Collecting Photographs

Dec 17, 2019-Mar 08, 2020

Commemorating the 35th anniversary of the Museum’s collection of photographs, this exhibition reveals the breadth and depth of the Getty’s acquisitions through an array of its greatest hidden treasures, none of which have been exhibited at the Getty before. Spanning the history of the medium from its early years to the present day, UNSEEN highlights visual associations between photographs from different times and places to encourage fresh discoveries and underscore a sense of continuity and change within the history of the medium. Curated by James A. Ganz, with Mazie Harris, Virginia Heckert, Karen Hellman, Arpad Kovacs, Amanda Maddox, and Paul Martineau.

J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center
Media Contact: Alexandria Sivak | (310) 440-6473 | asivak@getty.edu

Upcoming Exhibitions:

Untitled [Self-portrait with Bare-chested, Tattooed Latino Man], 1986. Madoka Takagi (American, born Japan, 1956 – 2015). Platinum and palladium print. Image: 24.3 × 19.4 cm (9 9/16 × 7 5/8 in.) Sheet: 31.4 × 27.6 cm (12 3/8 × 10 7/8 in.) © Estate of Madoka Takagi. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles

In Focus: Platinum Photographs

Jan 21, 2020-May 31, 2020

Revered for its velvety matte surface and neutral palette, the platinum process, introduced in 1873, helped establish photography as a fine art. The process was championed by prominent photographers until platinum was embargoed during World War I, but it attracted renewed interest during the mid-twentieth century from a relatively small but dedicated community of practitioners. This exhibition draws from the Getty Museum’s collection to showcase some of the most striking prints made with platinum and the closely related palladium processes. Curated by Arpad Kovacs.

J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center
Media Contact: Alexandria Sivak | (310) 440-6473 | asivak@getty.edu
Artists on the Move thumb

 

Petra, April 14, 1858. Edward Lear (British, 1812 - 1888). Pen and brown ink with watercolor and gouache on blue paper. Image: 36.2 × 54 cm (14 1/4 × 21 1/4 in.) The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles. 2008.45

Artists on the Move: Journeys and Drawings

Feb 11, 2020-May 03, 2020

Why did artists leave their homes behind? How did they use the medium of drawing to record their journeys? And how did mobility impact their draftsmanship? This exhibition, featuring works by Rubens, Canaletto, van Gogh, and Gauguin, explores such questions through a selection of European drawings from the Museum’s permanent collection, spanning from the sixteenth to the nineteenth centuries. Curated by Edina Adam.

J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center
Media Contact: Valerie Tate | (310) 440 -6861 | vtate@getty.edu

Study of a Mourning Woman, about 1500 – 1505. Michelangelo Buonarroti, Italian, 1475 – 1564. Pen and brown ink, heightened with white lead opaque watercolor. 26 × 16.5 cm (10 1/4 × 6 1/2 in.) The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles. 2017.78

Michelangelo: Mind of a Master

Feb 25, 2020-Jun 07, 2020

Michelangelo (1475-1564) was one of the most creative and influential artists in the history of western art. This exhibition explores the full range of his work as a painter, sculptor, and architect through more than two dozen of his extraordinary drawings, including designs for celebrated projects such as the Sistine Chapel ceiling, the Medici Chapel tombs, and the Last Judgement. These working studies and sketches enable us to witness Michelangelo at work, and to experience firsthand his boundless creativity and his pioneering representation of the human form. Curated by Julian Brooks and Edina Adam.

J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center
Media Contact: Amy Hood | 310 440-6427 | ahood@getty.edu
Media Contact: Valerie Tate | (310) 440 -6861 | vtate@getty.edu
Painted Prophecy


Maerten van Heemskerck. Dutch, 1498 - 1574. Judith, 1560. Pen and dark brown and light brown ink over black chalk, incised for
transfer. 19.8 × 25.2 cm (7 13/16 × 9 15/16 in.) The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles. 91.GG.17

Painted Prophecy: The Hebrew Bible through Christian Eyes

Mar 10, 2020-May 31, 2020

Images drawn from the Hebrew Bible (known to Christians as the Old Testament) were among the most popular subjects for Christian illuminated manuscripts in the Middle Ages. This exhibition brings manuscripts that explore the medieval Christian understanding of Hebrew scripture into dialogue with the Rothschild Pentateuch, a masterpiece of the Jewish manuscript tradition. Together, these objects from different religious traditions demonstrate how the Hebrew Bible was a living document, its contents subject to interpretation dependent on time and place. Curated by Larisa Grollemond.

J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center
Media Contact: Valerie Tate | (310) 440 -6861 | vtate@getty.edu
mesopotamiathumb

Statue of Gudea, Prince of Lagash, Dedicated to the Goddess. Geshtinanna, about 2120 B.C. Unknown. Dolerite. Object: H: 62 × W: 25.6 × D: 20 cm (24 7/16 × 10 1/16 × 7 7/8 in.). VEX.2020.1.138. Musée du Louvre, Département des Antiquités orientales. Image © Musée du Louvre, dist. RMN-GP / Raphaël Chipault / Art Resource, NY

Mesopotamia: Civilization Begins

Mar 18, 2020-Jul 27, 2020

Mesopotamia—the “land between the rivers” in modern-day Iraq—was home to the ancient Sumerians, Babylonians and Assyrians. Among their many achievements are the creation of the earliest known script (cuneiform), the formation of the first cities, the development of advanced astronomical and mathematical knowledge, and spectacular artistic and literary achievements. The exhibition covers three millennia from the first cities in about 3200 B.C. to Alexander the Great’s conquest of Babylon in 331 B.C. Curated by Timothy Potts and Ariane Thomas, Musee du Louvre, assisted by Jens Daehner and Sara Cole.  

J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Villa
Media Contact: Desiree Zenowich | (310) 440-7304 | dzenowich@getty.edu
Dora Thumb

Untitled, 1980s. Dora Maar, French, 1907 – 1997. Gelatin silver print. Image: 23.5 × 17.4 cm (9 1/4 × 6 7/8 in.) © Dora Maar Estate/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/ADAGP, Paris

Dora Maar (working title)

Apr 21, 2020-Jul 26, 2020

Enigmatic and endlessly fascinating, Dora Maar (French, 1907 – 1997) generated iconic surrealist photographs, engaged with political organizations, and established a commercial studio in Paris—all before the age of thirty. Despite these achievements, her work remains overshadowed by her relationship with Pablo Picasso. This exhibition examines Maar in her own right, tracing her career from assignments and street photographs made in the early 1930s—often the foundation for her surrealist photomontages—to postwar paintings. It also considers the rich historical context from which Maar emerged. Curated by Amanda Maddox (co-curators Damarice Amao and Karolina Lewandowska, Centre Pompidou).

J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center
Media Contact: Alexandria Sivak | (310) 440-6473 | asivak@getty.edu

Artists as Collectors

Jun 02, 2020-Aug 16, 2020

Artists were the earliest and greatest collectors of drawings. Celebrated painters including Giorgio Vasari, Thomas Lawrence, and Edgar Degas were passionate collectors, and their appetites for drawings by old and contemporary masters compelled them to acquire exceptional examples of draftsmanship by artists such as Raphael, Rembrandt, and Delacroix. Not just a tool for the making of works of art, drawings were valued as intellectual property, coveted rarities, and powerful status symbols. Curated by Stephanie Schrader and Casey Lee.

J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center
Media Contact: Valerie Tate | (310) 440 -6861 | vtate@getty.edu

In Focus: Election Eve

Jun 16, 2020-Nov 15, 2020

Photographs play a powerful role in American politics. This exhibition features William Eggleston’s Election Eve, a two-volume photography book made as the country readied for the 1976 presidential race, alongside other photographs from past and present that prompt reflection on the democratic process. Images of politicians, protests, and patriotism offer a timely take on civic life and the public experience of anticipation just before an election. Curated by Mazie Harris.

J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center
Media Contact: Alexandria Sivak | (310) 440-6473 | asivak@getty.edu

Power, Justice, and Tyranny in the Middle Ages

Jun 23, 2020-Sep 13, 2020

Medieval power structures included royal courts, the church, city governments, and even universities. Although positions of authority were usually inherited, leaders were expected to embrace justice, a virtue associated with godly rule, and tyranny, a vice that ensured downfall and chaos. Social and legal hierarchies exposed in manuscript illumination underscore the tenuous place of women, the poor, and other “out-groups.” Examples of good and bad government reveal the constant struggle between base human instincts and loftier ideals. Curated by Elizabeth Morrison, Kristen Collins, Larisa Grollemond, and Bryan Keene.

J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center
Media Contact: Valerie Tate | (310) 440 -6861 | vtate@getty.edu

William Blake: Visionary

Jul 21, 2020-Oct 11, 2020

A remarkable printmaker, painter, and poet, William Blake (1757–1827) developed a wildly unconventional world view, representing universal forces of creation and destruction—physical, psychological, historical—through his own cast of characters. By combining his poetry and images on the page through radical graphic techniques, Blake created some of the most striking and enduring imagery in British art. This major international loan exhibition explores the artist-poet’s imaginative world through his most celebrated works. Curated by Edina Adam and Julian Brooks. 

J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center
Media Contact: Amy Hood | 310 440-6427 | ahood@getty.edu
Media Contact: Valerie Tate | (310) 440 -6861 | vtate@getty.edu

De Kooning

Jul 22, 2020-Jan 10, 2021

Information to come. 

J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center
Media Contact: Amy Hood | 310 440-6427 | ahood@getty.edu

Pastel in the Late Nineteenth Century

Jul 28, 2020-Jan 24, 2021

Information to come. 

J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center
Media Contact: Valerie Tate | (310) 440 -6861 | vtate@getty.edu

Imogen Cunningham: A Retrospective

Sep 15, 2020-Jan 10, 2021

Imogen Cunningham (American, 1883–1976) enjoyed a long career as a photographer, creating a diverse body of work that underscores her vision, versatility, and commitment to the medium. The first major retrospective in the United States in more than 35 years, this exhibition brings together her insightful portraits, elegant flower and plant studies, poignant street pictures, and groundbreaking nudes in a visual celebration of Cunningham's immense contribution to the history of 20th-century photography. Curated by Paul Martineau. 

J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center
Media Contact: Alexandria Sivak | 310.440.6473 | asivak@getty.edu

Transcending Time: The Medieval Book of Hours

Oct 06, 2020-Mar 28, 2021

Manuscripts known as “books of hours” were among the most widely produced and used during the Middle Ages. These decorated prayer books not only structured time for their readers (over a day, a year, and a lifetime) but their creation reveals an increasing demand for private and personalized Christian devotion. Featuring masterpieces of medieval illumination from the permanent collection, this exhibition offers glimpses into the daily lives of their readers, the material features of luxury manuscripts, and the thriving late medieval book market. Curated by Larisa Grollemond. 

J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center
Media Contact: Valerie Tate | (310) 440 -6861 | vtate@getty.edu

Rubens: Picturing Antiquity

Oct 21, 2020-Jan 11, 2021

Passion for the art and literature of classical antiquity inspired the dynamic Flemish painter Peter Paul Rubens (1577–1640). Presented amidst the antiquities collection at the Getty Villa, this exhibition juxtaposes the artist’s exhilarating drawings, oil sketches, and monumental paintings with rarely shown ancient objects, including exquisite gems owned by Rubens himself. Heroic nudes, fierce hunts, splendid military processions, and Bacchic revels attest to the artist’s extraordinary ability to translate an array of sources into new subjects. curated by Davide Gasparotto, Jeffrey Spier, and Anne Woollett. 

J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Villa
Media Contact: Desiree Zenowich | (310) 440-7304 | dzenowich@getty.edu

Grand Design: 17th-Century French Drawings

Jun 08, 2021-Aug 29, 2021

The visual arts flourished in 17th-century France during a period known as the Grand Siècle or golden age of France. Presenting works from the Getty collection made by French draftsmen across the century, this exhibition includes drawings made for many different purposes: designs for ceiling paintings, altarpieces, sculptures, and prints; sketches made outdoors; and academic studies drawn in the studio. Together they testify to an era of courtly splendor, intellectual striving, and political upheaval. Curated by Emily Beeny. 

J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center
Media Contact: Valerie Tate | (310) 440 -6861 | vtate@getty.edu

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